Header graphic for print
Florida Construction Law Update

Category Archives: Subcontractors

Subscribe to Subcontractors RSS Feed

Notices to Owner Under Florida’s Lien Statute

Posted in Construction Contracts, Contractors, Lien, Subcontractors

Liens are a useful tool for contractors or subcontractors to obtain payment from the owners of construction projects in the event they are not paid for the work that has been performed.   Under Florida Statute § 713.06, if the contractor is not in privity with the owner, the contractor must give notice to the owner… Continue Reading

Legislative Update: Bills To Alter Florida’s Construction Lien Law Dies In Committee

Posted in Construction, Contractors, Florida Legislation, Lien, Subcontractors

Earlier this month, the Florida Legislature wrapped up its 2013 Regular Session. With its close on May 3, 2013, came the demise of legislation intended to make changes to Florida’s construction lien laws.  The legislation sought to: Revise the mandatory notice provision in contracts between owners and contractors [F.S. § 713.015 (1)]; Revise notice requirements… Continue Reading

Economic Loss Rule – A Narrowed Approach

Posted in Construction, Construction Contracts, Contractors, Negligence, Subcontractors

The Florida Supreme Court has finally taken the Economic Loss Rule head-on and has attempted to address an issue that has created much litigation.   On March 7, 2013, the Court released its opinion in the case of Tiara Condominium Association, Inc. v. Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. , 2013 WL 828003, significantly narrowing the application… Continue Reading

Massive Cost Overruns at World Trade Center Project – Unfortunate Situation for Contractors on a Meaningful Project

Posted in Bids, Change Orders, Construction, Construction Contracts, Contractors, Delays, Subcontractors

Thousands gathered on September 11, 2012 at the World Trade Center site in New York, which marked the 11th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks.  Although the construction of the World Trade Center project is not nearly complete, the construction of the One World Trade Center, a 104-story building, has begun to fill the… Continue Reading

A Tale of Two Districts: Florida Courts Split on the Application of Relation Back To Add Third Party Defendants As Direct Defendants After Expiration of the Statute of Limitations

Posted in Architects, Construction, Contractors, Negligence, Statutes of Limitations, Subcontractors, Uncategorized

The situation is a familiar one. An Owner of a completed construction project notifies the Architect and/or General Contractor of alleged construction deficiencies at a Project. Review by the Architect reveals that the alleged deficiencies, if true, relate to the work of its sub-consultants (or in the case of a General Contractor his subcontractors). The… Continue Reading

The Slavin Doctrine is Alive and Well – Ask CSK’s Clients!

Posted in Architects, Construction, Contractors, Design Professionals, Engineers, Professional Liability, Subcontractors

Cole, Scott and Kissane (“CSK”) recently won two very significant personal injury cases arising from construction projects on behalf of design professionals based on the Slavin Doctrine.  The Slavin doctrine prevents an injured Plaintiff from holding a contractor liable for injuries caused by a patent, or obvious, defect in construction after control of the property… Continue Reading

Appellate Rights for Arbitration Litigants

Posted in Architects, Construction, Construction Contracts, Contractors, Design Professionals, Developers, Engineers, Subcontractors

            As those in the industry are aware, the standard AIA documents – as well many of the other form contracts in construction – include arbitration provisions, the result of which is that many construction matters are litigated in arbitration fora. While arbitration is theoretically not as expensive a means of dispute resolution as the… Continue Reading

Preserving Coverage Defenses – The Latest Word

Posted in Construction, Insurance, Subcontractors

For an insurer, numerous obligations are triggered upon notification of the existence of a claim.  One of these is when a coverage defense can be asserted.  The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit recently clarified that in order to raise valid coverage defenses and steer clear of preventable pitfalls, insurers must be… Continue Reading

Bid Shopping Still in Vogue, Ask the Subcontractor

Posted in Architects, Bids, Construction, Construction Contracts, Contractors, Subcontractors

            The crude reality for most construction subcontractors is that after expending much time, effort and resources in preparing the lowest bid for a general contractor that is, itself, bidding a construction project, the general contractor will take the lowest subcontractor bid and go bid shopping after it is awarded the contract. A subcontractor’s conditional… Continue Reading

When It’s Necessary to Present Expert Testimony of Industry Standard to Establish the Standard of Care in Negligence Actions: The Case of the Roofer

Posted in Construction, Negligence, Roofer, Subcontractors

The United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit recently issued an opinion which has, in essence, confirmed the steps necessary in establishing a negligence action against a roofer in Florida.  While the standard of care necessary to prove whether a roof was negligent is a seemingly simple, everyday legal concept, proving it up… Continue Reading

Time’s up!: Florida Supreme Court may Consider Statute of Limitations Dispute in Multi-Party Construction Defect Claim

Posted in Construction, Engineers, Statutes of Limitations, Subcontractors

Time’s up! That’s never a phrase we want to hear. It evinces memories of school tests and entrance exams. Well, in the legal arena, deadlines are all the more critical. Litigants often fight over filing deadlines for cases, or statutes of limitation, in the prosecution and defense of claims. Most recently, the First District Court… Continue Reading

Contractor’s Home Office Overhead Likely Unrecoverable

Posted in Construction, Construction Contracts, Contractors, Delays, Subcontractors

When public construction projects are delayed by the government, contractors are often unable to bid on additional jobs and perform other work during the delay period. As a result, contractors often seek damages from the government for extended home office overhead during this delay, commonly referred to as Eichleay damages. However, courts have continually limited contractors’ ability to recover these costs by imposing burdensome requirements, which… Continue Reading

Difficulties a Contractor Faces When Dealing with Change Work

Posted in Architects, Change Orders, Construction, Construction Contracts, Contractors, Design Professionals, Professional Liability, Subcontractors

The Magazine of University of Florida’s School of Building Construction recently published an article written by David Salazar. The article is a primer on the difficulties a contractor faces when dealing with change order work. Additionally, the article sets forth the inevitable problems a contractor encounters and provides some risk management tips that can help… Continue Reading

A Florida Federal Trial Court Suggests That Contribution Between Comparatively At-Fault Parties Is Obsolete

Posted in Architects, Construction, Contractors, Design Professionals, Developers, Engineers, Indemnification, Professional Liability, Subcontractors, Subrogation

Is the cause of action for Contribution still a viable claim? A recent federal court suggested that Contribution between comparatively at-fault parties is no longer a viable claim in light of the availability of comparative fault defenses to liability. In Mendez-Garcia v. Galaxie Corp., 8:10-CV-788-T-24 EAJ, 2011 WL 5358658 (M.D. Fla. Nov. 3, 2011), the… Continue Reading

Florida Legislature Cracks Down on Unlicensed Practice of Mold Assessors and Mold Remediators

Posted in Construction, Construction Licensing, Subcontractors, Surety

Starting on July 1, 2011, the Florida Legislature began the full enforcement of the unlicensed practice of mold assessors and mold remediators.  This means that anyone holding themselves out to be a mold assessor or mold remediator needs to be licensed through the Department of Business and Professional Regulation (“DBPR”) before he or she can… Continue Reading